Here’s what volunteering at a hospital is really like. And why you should do it.

Have you ever considered volunteering at a hospital? It’s an important job that’s often overlooked. Photo by Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade via WikiCommons. When you think about the work done at hospitals and other care facilities, visions of doctors and nurses are probably first to come to mind. While these healthcare professionals do some of the most important work on the planet (and that’s no overstatement), volunteers are an integral part of the hospital’s ecosystem as well. Volunteers greet visitors, run groups, provide support to patients, wash and change linens, clean rooms, restock supplies and help ensure that the hospital is running cleanly and smoothly so that those providing medical care can focus on the patient’s physical health …

Sprucing up your community doesn’t have to be complicated. Try these simple tips.

We all want to live in clean, well-kept communities—but sometimes humans make that difficult. Garbage happens when we’re not careful. The wind knocks over someone’s unsecured trash bin and the contents blow all over. Someone pulls keys out of their pocket and a gum wrapper falls out. Litterbugs toss fast food wrappers out of their car windows. Whether intentional or not, trash makes its way into gutters, bushes and waterways every day. No one likes to walk down the street and see garbage littering the ground or graffiti covering buildings. But it’s not just unsightly. According to Keeping America Beautiful, the largest litter study conducted in the U.S., litter abatement costs more than $11 billion dollars per year. Photo by …

In rural Kenya, women’s healthcare can be hard to access. This program is changing that.

Susan, a 25-year-old who lives in rural West Pokot, Kenya, has a daily routine. All photos via Pfizer. She wakes up at 6am every day to get water from the river. She prepares breakfast for her family. She gets her five children ready for school. Then she sets off for work, caring for her animals and plowing the earth on her farm. On her one day off a week, she takes her family to church. She loves spending time with her family and community. Susan, and women like her, have always played an important role in the local culture. However, they’ve often had challenges accessing information and resources about their health, including the importance of healthy timing and spacing of …